Projection Mapping: Greensboro Science Center

Projection Mapping: Greensboro Science Center

The Greensboro Science Center – a zoo, aquarium, museum, and treetop adventure park in Greensboro, North Carolina – decided to create a Winter Wonderlights extravaganza this year as a way to “Celebrate the holidays with your loved ones surrounded by shimmering lights, brilliant colors, and joyful sounds of the season!” while still outdoors.

The Science Center hired renowned producers GES to create and develop the concept. GES then called on their relationship with Starlite to provide technical elements – lighting, video, and audio – throughout the zoo.

One of the components Starlite was tasked with was transforming a 42-foot wide barn into a larger-than-life immersive gingerbread house through large-format projection mapping. 

Starlite used Christie DLP high-output projectors in Tempest outdoor climate-controlled enclosures. The content was delivered and video-mapped with Mac servers running QLAB software. 

GES provided the show concept and produced the video content. 

Starlite utilized show control to automate the functions of the media server, projectors, and audio equipment. This allowed for a more streamlined process for the on-site technicians.

The show ran each evening, from Thanksgiving through New Year’s Day.

Starlite Collaborates With Local Artist During Papal Visit In Philadelphia

Starlite Collaborates With Local Artist During Papal Visit In Philadelphia

Starlite and local artist, Meg Saligman have an extensive history of working together on one-of-a-kind projects – and this project was indeed unique and challenging.

The challenge was threefold:

First, we were tasked with projecting high-resolution images incorporating the iconic architectural features of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter & Paul on an extremely oxidized copper dome (i.e. aqua).

We chose the Barco HDQ-2K40 projector which, with its 40,000-lumen output we were reasonably confident that it would do the trick, even though getting the 462-pound projector to the top floor would be a bear.

Next, projecting on a domed surface required the use of pixel mapping, which Starlite handled via it’s Hippotizer V4 media server.

Lastly, we had to locate the projector some 400 feet away from the dome, on the top floor of a hotel across the street, which was in the midst of a renovation…and just to make it a bit more challenging – where the Secret Service were positioned!

The content featured a 15-minute video reel consisting of various religious imagery and symbolizations that played on a loop every night of the World Meeting of Families.

While a project of this caliber requires weeks or months of planning and coordination, it is exhilarating to see such a historical go off flawlessly.

Pin It on Pinterest